Fly the Rolls-Royce way to London

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Navy Growlers draw massive sky penis

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Those that argue that the US Navy is a phallocentric Freudian organisation were given succour today by photos circulating showing a massive sky penis reportedly drawn in the sky by pilots from Naval Air Station Whidbey Island—the home of the Navy’s fleet of EA-18G Growlers. 

Image from @anahi_torres_ story shared by The Drive

Top 10 aircraft camo schemes 2017

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Chinese Z-8s have an amazing camo scheme but we couldn’t fit them on our list.

Modern military aircraft are all painted in a desperately boring shade of grey… well, almost all. Air Forces Monthly Editor Thomas Newdick teams up with Hush-Kit’s Joe Coles to dig deep, and uncover ten masterpieces of conspicuous inconspicuity.

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10. Antonov An-26 ‘Curl’, Kazakh Border Guard, ‘Chocolate pudding’  WHITE-04-Antonov-An-26_PlanespottersNet_434862

 

9. Northrop F-5N Tiger II, US Navy, ‘Rhythm of the Saints’a68564da8bcdaf5002bf1afb13e1531e 2.jpg

This Navy aggressor impresses with a wild dazzling stripe scheme.

8. Lockheed Martin F-16C Fighting Falcon, US Air Force ‘Arctic monkey’

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7. Sukhoi Su-27UB ‘Flanker’, Eritrean Air Force, ‘Splinter faction’SU-27UB 609 ERITREO ERITREA 05-06-2002.jpg

African ‘phwoar-lord’.

 

6. ShinMaywa US-2, Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force, ‘Blue steel’2211693.jpg

Smart as hell. US Pacific World War II style? 1950s US Navy chic? Steel blue with crisp red Hinomaru: perfection.

5. Grumman F-14AM Tomcat, Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force, ‘Shi-raz-clart Mehrabadboy’F-14-IRIAF.jpg

A smart desert splinter scheme reminiscent of an airshow ‘Flanker’ of the 1990s gives this Iranian Tomcat a certain something. Smart white undersides.

4. Antonov An-22 ‘Cock’, Russian Air Force, ‘Insert heteronormative Cock joke here’

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Attempting to hide such a massive airlifter is an exercise in futility. Still, nice Bond-esque scheme.

3. MD Helicopters MD500, Korean People’s Air Force, ‘Lime twizzler’img_1344-2a.jpg

Crazy colours, turquoise belly. Job’s a good’un.

2. Grumman S-2T Tracker, Republic of China Air Force, ‘Return to the blue lagoon’s-2t-1.jpg

Carnival time, down in Taiwan.

 

  1. McDonnell Douglas F-4EJ Phantom II, Japan Air-Self Defense Force, ‘Digital Forest Ranger’ ghhg.pngfucknutt.pngSpetsnaz Viggen. Disrupticon prime.

 

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Want to see more stories like this: Follow my vapour trail on Twitter: @Hush_kit

This site needs your help to continue. Our site is absolutely free and we have no advertisements (any you do see, are from WordPress). If you’ve enjoyed an article you can donate here. 

Have a look at How to kill a RaptorAn Idiot’s Guide to Chinese Flankers, the 10 worst British military aircraftThe 10 worst French aircraft,  Su-35 versus Typhoon10 Best fighters of World War II top WVR and BVR fighters of today, an interview with a Super Hornet pilot and a Pacifist’s Guide to Warplanes. Was the Spitfire overrated? Want something more bizarre? The Top Ten fictional aircraft is a fascinating read, as is The Strange Story and The Planet Satellite. The Fashion Versus Aircraft Camo is also a real cracker. Those interested in the Cold Way should read A pilot’s guide to flying and fighting in the Lightning. Those feeling less belligerent may enjoy A pilot’s farewell to the Airbus A340. Looking for something more humorous? Have a look at this F-35 satire and ‘Werner Herzog’s Guide to pusher bi-planes or the Ten most boring aircraft. In the mood for something more offensive? Try the NSFW 10 best looking American airplanes, or the same but for Canadians. 

My favourite aeroplane in 200 words #41: Rockwell XFV-12

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Argue with me, if you will, about whether the XFV-12 was an “airplane”, on the pedantic grounds that airplanes can leave the ground under their own power. Point out to me, kindly or with malice, that its 70s Kustom Van paint job, reminiscent of some early arcade cabinet or Sandy Frank sci-fi epic, is a gleaming disguise for the Frankensteinian joining of Phantom and Skyhawk parts, intended to save time and money during the US defence establishment’s post-Vietnam doldrums.

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Don’t care. The love of warplanes is a vice, and the XFV-12, with its inability to carry its own weight let alone a bombload, is the aviation equivalent of a very tasty lite beer. Relieved of considering any moral dimensions, we can focus on the aesthetics of this hopeful monster, and fully appreciate its melding of the beautifully sleek with the slightly clumsy and the subtly alien. The rakish, confident twin tails, framing the slick landing gear enclosures! The huge yet somehow elegant diamondesque canards! The faintly toylike proportions and ever so slightly silly nose. I want to put on a PVC flight suit marked with Rockwell’s corporate-slick logo, climb into this plane, and blast off towards a future painted by Syd Mead, rising on a white-hot column of pure techno-fantasy.

(Rik Haines lives in Cascadia, uses unusual pronouns, and plays too much Kerbal Space Program.)

It also also makes an appearance on the 10 worst US aircraft here

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My favourite aeroplane in 200 words #40: North American 0-47

101st_Observation_Squadron_O-47.jpg“Favourites?  Mustang, Spitfire, yeah…boring.  Mythologies rather than experiences. The closest any of us have gotten to the royalty of the air are plastic models or a glimpse at an airshow.

Not me.  As a kid, I spent hours surrounded by the scent of aluminium, old oil, and rubber… in my own plane.

It was an 0-47.

The 0-47 was so anonymous that the Army didn’t even give it a name.

No Storch, no Lystander, just an number.  Starting with a Zed.

North American built 250, a tiny number… [for America]   

No guns, it was designed to observe with a mile long greenhouse on top and a fat belly underneath with camera ports.

It was my airplane.

On a sleepy country airport one sat derelict axle deep in weeds.  Just a mile of walking, carrying a camp stool for the missing pilot seat, my sister and my best friend could fly to Europe destroy the Axis.

The pilot’s stick still waggled the bare ailerons who, like rudder, it’s yaw buddy, had lost their fabric years ago.

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The author (on the right)

No cowling, prop, nor glass in the canopy, but deep inside it’s green cavernous interior, sitting at the observer’s station, the two camera port doors could be cranked open pushing the weeds aside to reveal the Japanese fleet..

The 90 degree Oklahoma Summer, the sound of cicadas, and this thing that once flew, were a 10 year old’s perfect day.

There is a flying example in California.  Now, for me as a pilot, the need is great…”

– Jack Murphy

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An air force of my own #2: France 1937

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 “A faster version of the superbly agile MS 406 would be just the ticket.”

Could France have been saved from the Nazi invasion by a better air force? We put Greg Baughen in charge of aircraft procurement for the year 1937; with 80 years of hindsight can he save France?

To support this site you may buy an aviation calendar here. It’s your support that keeps us going. Many thanks. 

Air Force Procurement

Head of procurement: Greg Baughen

Occupation: Teacher turned author

Nation to defend: France

Year: 1937

In the mid- thirties France looked set to build the air force it would need in 1940. The disastrous BCR bomber-reconnaissance-fighter plane had been abandoned, there was talk of fleets of ground attack planes halting armoured divisions in their tracks, and General Denain, the Air Minister, was planning to build an entirely new sort of air force, with  specialised fighter, medium bombers, ground attack planes, dive-bombers  – and the target date for the new plan just happened to be 1940.

Unfortunately, these plans went up in smoke when the 1936 Rhineland crisis reignited fears about German bombers devastating French cities. Large long-range bombers to deter became the priority again.

Thank you for reading Hush-Kit. This site is in peril as it is well below its funding targets. If you’ve enjoyed an article you can donate here.

But what if Hitler had got cold feet and the Rhineland crisis never happened?

It’s no good messing with the impossible. Squadrons of weird Arsenal-Delanne 10 tandem biplanes, clever tandem engined Arsenal VB 10s and brutish Sud-Est S.E.100s may look good, but the air battles in 1940 were fought with planes that had their origins in the years 1933-1935, or upgrades of these, and that’s what we have to go with.

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With a 352 mph top speed and superb agility, a ‘Super 406’ would have achieved parity with the best fighters in the world.

That means the fighter has to be the MS 406 –  but not the 300 mph original version. By 1939 it should have been in production with a ducted Hurricane type radiator instead of the retractable system (worth an extra 12 mph), Szydlowski-Planiol supercharger —the 920 hp HS 12Y45 engine – (worth another 20 mph), ejector exhaust stubs (an extra 20 mph at 7,000 metres ) and two belt-fed guns in each wing, instead of a drum-fed gun. All these improvements had been trialled, tested and were available. They were all wasted on the Dewoitine D.520, which never reached its intended 354 mph top speed and didn’t reach the squadrons in time anyway. A faster version of the superbly agile MS 406 would be just the ticket.

What were the top 10 fighters at the outbreak of War? Answer here

Tactical force 

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The Bloch 151/152 was useless as a fighter but here is our perfect fighter-bomber. Very manoeuvrable at low level, extremely rugged and with two HS 404 20 mm cannon, a useful ground attack plane even without any bombs. Bloch were actually advertising it as a ground attack plane in 1937.

 For tactical bombing, it has to be the cheap and very easy to build Potez 63. A lightweight design perhaps, but the Potez 639 version carried extensive armour protection for the crew, a 20 mm cannon for ground strafing and five internal and five external 110-lb bombs. Admittedly, there were problems fitting the bombs in the armoured fuselage, but reduce the bomb load and we’ve got a good low-level attack bomber. 

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How the Fairey Battle won the war here

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The beautiful Amiot 570.

The same plane minus armour and with a bomb sight would do as a light bomber (the Potez 633). It was faster and more manoeuvrable than the Do 17 and had the same bomb load as the Blenheim. Range was limited, but the targets are the German panzers, not Berlin. This version was in production – but for export only.

No dive-bombers, shallow dive-bombing with the above is fine.

A long-range bomber is needed to keep the politicians happy. The Farman (SNCAC) 220 series looks horrible (there go my points for aesthetics) but carried an impressive 10,000 lb bomb load and ideal for indiscriminate retaliation by night.

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Farman (SNCAC) 220

For long-range day bombing, definitely not the disastrous LeO 451. This was difficult to fly, expensive to  build and, in 1937, could only get into the air with 1,000 hp HS AA engines that never worked properly.  The much lighter, easier to build and cheaper Amiot 340 with the tried and tested Gnome Rhone Mistral Majors or even the Amiot 370 with the HS 12Y31 were much better bets (and wins me back some of my  points for aesthetics). They flew in 1937, but Amiot had been working on them since 1933 and if Felix Amiot had not been in permanent dispute with the French Air Ministry,  and the Ministry had not insisted on using the HS AA engine that didn’t work, a useful bomber could have been available even sooner.

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Amiot 340

If we need an interim medium bomber, the French flirtation with the BCR planes means the cupboard is pretty bare. The Breguet 462 adaptation of the Breguet 460 BRC was probably the best bet (and certainly better than the disastrous Bloch 131). It flew a year before the Amiot 340, was capable of 250 mph and provided something like the  capability of the Heinkel 111. 

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The Potez 63.11

For short-range observation duties the Potez 63.11 is fine, as long as it only has to peep over the frontline and not fly deep in the enemy rear. For deeper penetration we need fighter -reconnaissance planes, the Bloch 151/2 or MS 406 would be ideal. (In 1940 the French were planning to use the MS 406 for this, but simply didn’t have enough).  For longer range reconnaissance we have the Amiot 340/350.

We also put modern RAF procurement in different hands, the result is here

The D.520, D.550 and Bloch 174 were fine planes, but couldn’t arrive in time. The previous generation, with less production capacity wasted on long-range bombers and artillery spotter planes and more on short-range tactical bombers and lots of fighters to escort them, (i.e. don’t turn over factories producing the MS 406 to the LeO 451!) and the French could have had an air force to match the Luftwaffe.

Our Verdict

Political considerations

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Given that the ‘Armée de l’air du Greg Baughen‘ consists entirely of domestic aircraft this Air Force is going to play very well with French industrialists and nationalist types at home. However this France looks extremely isolationist which might not impress its Allies so much but hey, war’s around the corner, big deal. This air force would not involve any awkward legislative export or import considerations of any kind (unlike the supply of Soviet equipment to Republic Spain for example) and as such is a sure fire hit not to annoy anyone.

95/100

Aesthetic appeal 

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Amiot 370

Nearly all French military aircraft of the 1930s were hideous, including the ones that never entered service, so judging the aesthetic appeal of any French Air Force, real or imagined is a tough call. Nonetheless the inclusion of the Amiot 370 (an Art Deco masterpiece) and Baughen’s aesthetically pleasing alterations to the cuddly MS.406 show a genuine desire to make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear or a Farman 220. Given the material available this is a sterling effort

90/100

Realism

The homework that has gone into this is nothing short of impressive, it would undoubtedly have been a more effective force to meet the German invasion of 1940, and on domestic aircraft production it is difficult to fault. However, the absolute omission of foreign aircraft (or engines) is perplexing. In reality, the most successful fighter over France in 1940 was the Curtiss Hawk 75, despite making up a mere 12% of the fighter force, Hawks were responsible for a third of all kills scored between September 1939 and the French capitulation in 1940. True, the French obtained these aircraft only after overcoming considerable objection at home (one Curtiss cost double an MS 406) and in America (the export licence was only granted after the personal intervention of President Roosevelt) so it could be argued that getting any more from the US would have been extremely difficult but there were other sources of decent aircraft available. Britain managed to find capacity to export Hurricanes for Belgium, Finland, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Romania, Latvia and Poland before the fall of France and it would not be hard to imagine a French order receiving priority over, say, Turkey, due to its strategic importance. Italian aircraft were also available – France actually did obtain five Caproni 313s and the UK had 300 Reggiane Re 2000s on order before Italy declared war in 1940. Even Germany had an inexplicable habit of exporting modern military aircraft to nations it would shortly invade. Anyway, brilliant, brilliant work on the French stuff but where’s everyone else? Je ne sais pas.

75/100

Imagination

As Baughen says ‘Squadrons of weird Arsenal-Delanne 10 tandem biplanes, clever tandem engined Arsenal VB 10s and brutish Sud-Est S.E.100s may look good‘ and indeed they do so where are they? Likewise where’s the plans for a presidential Latécoère 631? Or the fighter variant of the Bugatti racer? This Air Force is profoundly imaginative within the bounds of good sense but for entertaining, just-about-plausible craziness it’s a teensy bit lacking.

65/100

The Rise and Fall of the French Air Force: French Air Operations and Strategy 1900-1940 by Greg Baughen is out soon. 

Greg Baughen has spent a lifetime researching British and French aviation history. Retirement has provided the opportunity to turn this research into a series of books. The first three on the history of British air power have been published , Blueprint for Victory, The Rise of the Bomber and The RAF in the Battle of France and the Battle of Britain.  He has also  published a reappraisal of  the operational career of The Fairey Battle. “The Rise and Fall of the French Air Force 1900-1940” will be published later this year. 

To support this site you may buy an aviation calendar here. It’s your support that keeps us going. Many thanks. 

Thank you for reading Hush-Kit. This site is in peril as it is well below its funding targets. If you’ve enjoyed an article you can donate here. 

Have a look at How to kill a RaptorAn Idiot’s Guide to Chinese Flankers, the 10 worst British military aircraftThe 10 worst French aircraft,  Su-35 versus Typhoon10 Best fighters of World War II top WVR and BVR fighters of today, an interview with a Super Hornet pilot and a Pacifist’s Guide to Warplanes. Want something more bizarre? The Top Ten fictional aircraft is a fascinating read, as is The Strange Story and The Planet Satellite. The Fashion Versus Aircraft Camo is also a real cracker. Those interested in the Cold Way should read A pilot’s guide to flying and fighting in the Lightning. Those feeling less belligerent may enjoy A pilot’s farewell to the Airbus A340. Looking for something more humorous? Have a look at this F-35 satire and ‘Werner Herzog’s Guide to pusher bi-planes or the Ten most boring aircraft. In the mood for something more offensive? Try the NSFW 10 best looking American airplanes, or the same but for Canadians. 

Amiot 370

 

Mirage pilot interview, Part 5: Looping in Diamond Nine

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Now a crack aerobatic pilot, Gonzalo O’Kelly was once one of the best fighter pilots in the Spanish air force. During his time in the Ejército del Aire he flew the Mirage III, a formidable and beautiful fighter of French origin. In the fifth and part of our Mirage special he talks reveals more on the Dassault ‘Magic triangle‘.

“Another sortie I love to remember was no doubt, a non-accounted world record. It was May 1980. An Armed Forces Week was to be celebrated in Valencia, ending with a big military parade with an air force flypast. The 11th Wing would be hosting, so we should display the most dramatically. A diamond nine was planned and as usual, a training flight would be flown to check ground references and have some fun.

The leader of the training flight was my Squadron Chief, Mayor Carretero, one of the greatest pilots I’ve ever met and a member of a Spanish Aerobatic Team for many years, and still flying.

I was placed in the centre of the diamond, behind the leader. We took off in threes, joined up and climbed to 20,000 feet over the sea, southeast of the Base, flying parallel to the shoreline.

Some sweet turns and manoeuvres were made to make everyone feel comfortable, and then we heard the leader on the tactical frequency, “Let’s make a loop”. At once every aircraft around me flickered up and down as if they, not their pilots of course, were suddenly nervous. Well, I must say I was quite nervous.And then, confirmation, “We’ll fly a loop, I’ll dive to get 550 kts with such power, and flying as gently as possible”.

Imagine, a diamond nine as the Red Arrows do, but with Mirages IIIs! And down we went, speed 550 kts and gently the noses go up, more and more and then we are facing down again as if it was business as usual. Mayor Carretero asked by the radio how it was received, and there was enthusiastic requests asking for more from all the pilots.

And more we did, performing a further two loops. Nobody saw us, not even one picture was taken, but still we did it. The glory of flying at its best.”

What should I have asked you? 

“I think your questionnaire is very good and covers everything about the Mirage III people would like to know. I could only add how I felt after four years flying a glamorous legend, an aircraft placed in a very short list of flying wonders every aviation fan knows. It was a real honour, the F1 was better, but the Mirage III was as historically significant as the 11th Wing itself. From Fiat CR-32s, to Messerschmitts, to Sabres on to the Mirage III, and today, Typhoons.

I was also lucky enough to be able to master such a difficult warhorse, and I’m proud of being a small part of 11th Wing long history.”23432247_10156844500343642_938685336_o

What do you think of the appearance of the Mirage III

“As I said in the beginning, it was a beautiful aircraft and highly photogenic as any other delta winged plane. It also had a nice camouflage paint scheme which I miss instead of that universal light grey every air force uses today, which is utterly dull and boring

What was the Mirage like in the following ways:

A. Instantaneous and sustained turn rates

“Well, not very good at instantaneous- but better in sustained turns as with everything else, with the nose down.”

B. Agility

“Hmmmm, next question please.”

C. Climb rate

“Good enough in those years.”

D. Landing and taking-off 

“The take-off run was quite long in clean configuration, and scary at or near maximum weight. Every Mirage III pilot remembers those 185 kts of approach speed.”

E. Reliability

“Very good. I’ve already talked about the engine. I never heard of a flame-out, only some compressor stalls and all of them were pilots error induced. We in the 11th Wing, enjoyed highly experienced mechanics and engineers, and their work was outstanding. It was very common to have 80% of the fleet operative, and it was never below 50%.”

Tell me something I don’t know about the Mirage III

“The Mirage III operations manual stated that ceiling was an astonishing 70,000 feet, but the only way of reaching that altitude was with a rocket engine installed below the engine nozzle. Of course, the pilot had to wear a pressurised flying suit to climb to an altitude where you can see practical demonstration of Copernicus’ theories: the Earth is round! This rocket was called the SEPR 84, and burnt a mixture of normal Jet A1 and nitric acid.

While the contract for buying the Mirages was negotiated, it looked like our air force was interested in adding the rockets. A special hangar was built at the base to handle the rockets and their very dangerous fuel. Pressurised flying suits were acquired together with their refrigeration cases (very similar to the ones used by astronauts). In the end they served to ‘welcome’ new lieutenants, who were ordered to try the suit (without the comfort of the refrigeration case).

In the end, and happily for the pilots, they decided not to buy them. If you’ve seen The Right Stuff, you’ll understand why by remembering the scene in which Yeager is flying an F-104 rocket assisted, and suddenly and a very high altitude, the rocket flames out.

Another feature of the Mirage III was its Mach 2 capacity, a common capability from the 1960s onwards, but absolutely useless. In the Initial Training Course they gave us one sortie dedicated to reaching Mach 2.

The procedure was to climb to the troposphere in a south east track from base, over the Mediterranean, and fly away 250 NM. Then you inverted the heading towards home, set maximum afterburner and began acceleration in level flight until you reached Mach 1.4. Then you climbed maintaining 1.4 until reaching 40.000 feet, level again to accelerate to Mach 1,8, and again maintaining this Mach climb to 50, 000 to level and accelerate to Mach 2, which didn’t always happened. After reaching Mach 2 you made a pure ballistic trajectory climbing until you had to lower the nose to maintain speed.And then, the deceleration. Afterburner OFF and descending. It was forbidden to throttle back above Mach 1,4, so speed brakes and Gs were mandatory once back in the atmosphere.

We finished about 40 or 50 miles from base and with just enough fuel for transit and landing. During the whole acceleration and even more during deceleration, controls had to be handled with extreme finesse, as the movie demonstrated.

In my Mach 2 sortie, I got it and reached 65,000 feet.”

Want to see more stories like this: Follow my vapour trail on Twitter: @Hush_kit

Thank you for reading Hush-Kit. Our site is absolutely free and we have no advertisements. If you’ve enjoyed an article you can donate here. 

Have a look at How to kill a RaptorAn Idiot’s Guide to Chinese Flankers, the 10 worst British military aircraftThe 10 worst French aircraft,  Su-35 versus Typhoon10 Best fighters of World War II top WVR and BVR fighters of today, an interview with a Super Hornet pilot and a Pacifist’s Guide to Warplanes.Want something more bizarre? The Top Ten fictional aircraft is a fascinating read, as is The Strange Story and The Planet Satellite. The Fashion Versus Aircraft Camo is also a real cracker. Those interested in the Cold Way should read A pilot’s guide to flying and fighting in the Lightning. Those feeling less belligerent may enjoy A pilot’s farewell to the Airbus A340. Looking for something more humorous? Have a look at this F-35 satire and ‘Werner Herzog’s Guide to pusher bi-planes or the Ten most boring aircraft. In the mood for something more offensive? Try the NSFW 10 best looking American airplanes, or the same but for Canadians. 

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10 amazing things you didn’t know about Air Force One

 

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Air Force One is the most important aircraft in the world, as this heavily modified airliner is used to carry the US President and his friends. The ultra high-tech jet can transport the Commander-In-Chief to any airport in the world in luxury and safety, and has some startling and unique features. Here are 10 astonishing facts you didn’t know about Air Force One. 

 

10. The aircraft is able to communicate with nuclear submarines. The communication pipe is over 120 miles long and is trailed from the aircraft’s main door. One end goes to the President’s chair, the other through the snorkel and onto the command deck of every Ohio Class Submarine.

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9. Like all airliners, sickbags are provided. In AF1 they are made from the flags of vanquished enemies.

Google reveals F-35 is overexposed here.

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It is customary for the President and First Lady to honour the ‘Lift-a-loft’ step on exiting the aircraft. The first couple will stay an average of one hour on this step to celebrate the achievements of the American company that makes it possible to exit large aircraft. Before Lift-a-a-loft was established (in 1962) many passengers starved to death, unable to leave their aircraft.

8. The aircraft is equipped with over 500 miles of Scalextric track.

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Dick Cheney’s favourite car to play on the onboard Scalextric track was a custom-made gold AMC Gremlin. Trump has a red Pontiac Firebird.

10 worst US aircraft here

7. On a hostile radar the aircraft appears as a mighty eagle holding lightning in its claws.

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6. Legally the interior of the Air Force One is considered the interior of the President’s mind, therefore US law and dreams are in force there, wherever the aeroplane is. The President’s nightmares are filtered out by a series of state-of-the-art ‘dreamcatchers’ developed by engine manufacturer Pratt & Whitney.

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5. Over two litres of the President’s sperm is stored in a refrigerated unit in the rear fuselage. In the case of nuclear war, this will aid repopulation efforts.

4. The skull of President Nixon is given its own seat on all flights. This tradition was started by George W Bush, and has been continued by subsequent Presidents. It is said by the famously superstitious pilots that Washington will fall if Nixon’s skull is not carried aboard.

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3. In 2006 AF1 (then occupied by George W Bush) met Putin’s equivalent aircraft (the Ilyushin IL-96-300-PU) in the sky above Tokyo. Both leaders being competitive men, insisted that their own aircraft should reach Narita International Airport first. The details of the ad hoc drag-race that ensued were until recently a state secret. During the 20 minute race, AF1 reached an astonishing speed of twice the speed of sound (aided by two escorting F-22 Raptors pushing it). Though AF1 reached the airport perimeter first, Bush was despondent to seeing the Russian leader landing ahead of him…by parachute!

Support us and in live in airworthy condition with our beautiful 2018 calendar

2. There is a strict ‘no political chat’ rule on AF1; the President has designated it an official chill-out zone.

1. The President’s overhead luggage bin, is a whopping 10% bigger than a regular one. He is also allowed to bring on a generous two items of hand luggage.

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Find out 10 amazing things you didn’t know about the Spitfire here.

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Have a look at How to kill a RaptorAn Idiot’s Guide to Chinese Flankers, the 10 worst British military aircraftThe 10 worst French aircraft,  Su-35 versus Typhoon10 Best fighters of World War II top WVR and BVR fighters of today, an interview with a Super Hornet pilot and a Pacifist’s Guide to Warplanes.Want something more bizarre? The Top Ten fictional aircraft is a fascinating read, as is The Strange Story and The Planet Satellite. The Fashion Versus Aircraft Camo is also a real cracker. Those interested in the Cold Way should read A pilot’s guide to flying and fighting in the Lightning. Those feeling less belligerent may enjoy A pilot’s farewell to the Airbus A340. Looking for something more humorous? Have a look at this F-35 satire and ‘Werner Herzog’s Guide to pusher bi-planes or the Ten most boring aircraft. In the mood for something more offensive? Try the NSFW 10 best looking American airplanes, or the same but for Canadians. 

Air_Force_One_over_Mt._Rushmore

Order your limited edition aviation calendar today

Calendar

Support your second favourite aviation blog and treat yourself or a loved one to a feast of aeronautical tomfoolery across 2018.

Our calendar features:

+ 12 Exquisite hand-drawn aeroplanes. Twelve of the greatest aeroplanes ever flown, including:

Supermarine Spitfire
Hawker Nimrod
EE Lightning
Lockheed P-38 Lightning
Douglas A-4 Skyhawk
Sikorsky S-38
Dassault Mirage III
Macchi MC202 Folgore
Heinkel He 162
Focke Wulf Fw 200 Condor
Mitsubishi A6M Reisen
MiG-21

+ Thirteen of the greatest aircraft designers (some in swimwear, some in underwear)

RJ Mitchell, Sydney Camm, Teddy Petter, Kelly Johnson, Ed Heinemann,
Igor Sikorsky, Marcel Dassault, Mario Castoldi, Ernst Heinkel, Kurt Tank
Jiro Horikoshi, Artem Mikoyan and Mikhail Gurevich.

+Dozens of significant aviation dates marked

Bonus Blackburn Skua cutaway

Please order swiftly to avoid disappointment as these are extremely limited edition.

Order your calendar today by emailing hushkiteditorial@gmail.com

£16.00 + P&P

Bonus Blackburn Skua cutaway

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